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Wednesday, July 16, 2014 - Updated: 6:27 AM

Lincoln Center to stream Seeger memorial concert

NEW YORK (AP) -- Lincoln Center in New York says it will offer a live stream from a weekend memorial concert for Pete Seeger and his wife Toshi.

The free concert will be held Sunday at Lincoln Center's Damrosch Park. It will feature artists and speakers who had a close personal relationship with the Seegers. They include Judy Collins, Harry Belafonte, Dar Williams, Peter Yarrow, Holly Near and Tom Chapin.

Lincoln Center notes that Seeger loved to lead singalongs. In that spirit, it's inviting audiences to take part in a global online singalong.

A song will be selected later this week and lyrics will be available on-screen.

Billy Joel's mother, inspiration for song, dies

HICKSVILLE (AP) -- The mother of singer-songwriter Billy Joel, who inspired him to write "Rosalinda's Eyes," has died in New York at the age of 92.

Rosalind Nyman Joel died Sunday on Long Island, said Claire Mercuri, a spokeswoman for the award-winning singer.

"Rosalinda's Eyes" from Joel's 1978 album "52nd Street" was a tribute to his mother, who raised him alone after divorcing his father, Howard Joel, in 1957.

The lyrics include the words: "I've got music in my hands; The work is hard to find; But that don't get me down; Rosalinda understands."

Rosalind Joel worked in a clerical capacity for various businesses near her home in Hicksville, Long Island, and supported a number of charities.

Born in Brooklyn to English emigrants, she met her husband in 1942 at a City College musical production and married him three years later. Their son, Billy, was born in 1949. The couple later adopted Judy, the daughter of Rosalind's late sister Muriel.

Billy Joel endowed the Rosalind Joel Scholarship for the Performing Arts at City College in 1986.

Vehicles stuck in mud after music festival ends

SAUGERTIES (AP) -- Hundreds of vehicles remain stuck in the mud at an outdoor concert site in the Hudson Valley after violent storms forced a three-day festival to end early.

Local media report that tow trucks and farmers' tractors are being used Monday to pull vehicles out of the muck at the Winston Farm in Saugerties.

Thousands of music fans began arriving Friday for the Hudson Project, which featured more than 80 acts, including Modest Mouse and the Flaming Lips.

The festival was scheduled to end around midnight Sunday, but the promoters and emergency officials shut it down late in the afternoon after severe storms hit the area.

The Winston Farm was the site of the 1994 Woodstock 25th anniversary concert that drew 350,000 people.


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