Advertisement
 
Monday, October 20, 2014
Amsterdam, NY ,

The Associated Press This April 28, 2009, file photo shows smog covering downtown Los Angeles.

Advertisement

EPA tightens standards for soot pollution

Saturday, December 15, 2012 - Updated: 6:29 PM

WASHINGTON (AP) -- In its first major regulation since the election, the Obama administration on Friday imposed a new air quality standard that reduces by 20 percent the maximum amount of soot released into the air from smokestacks, diesel trucks and other sources of pollution.

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa Jackson said the new standard will save thousands of lives each year and reduce the burden of illness in communities across the country, as people "benefit from the simple fact of being able to breathe cleaner air."

As a mother of two sons who have battled asthma, Jackson said she was pleased that "more mothers like me will be able to rest a little easier knowing their children, and their children's children, will have cleaner air to breathe for decades to come."

Announcement of the new standard met a court deadline in a lawsuit by 11 states and public health groups. The new annual standard is 12 micrograms per cubic meter of air, down from the current 15 micrograms per cubic meter.

The new soot standard has been highly anticipated by environmental and business groups, who have battled over the extent to which it would protect public health or cause job losses. The EPA said its analysis shows the rule will have a net benefit ranging from about $3.6 billion to $9 billion a year.

A study by the American Lung Association and other groups said the new standard will save an estimated 15,000 lives a year -- many in urban areas where exposure to emissions from older, dirty diesel engines and coal-fired power plants are greatest.

Soot, or fine particulate matter, is made up of microscopic particles released from smokestacks, diesel trucks, wood-burning stoves and other sources and contributes to haze. Breathing in soot can cause lung and heart problems, contributing to heart attacks, strokes and asthma attacks.

Environmental groups and public health advocates welcomed the new standard, saying it will protect millions of Americans at risk for soot-related asthma attacks, lung cancer, heart disease and premature death.

Dr. Norman H. Edelman, chief medical officer for the American Lung Association, said a new standard will force industries to clean up what he called a "lethal pollutant." Reducing soot pollution "will prevent heart attacks and asthma attacks and will keep children out of the emergency room and hospitals," Edelman said in a statement. "It will save lives."

But congressional Republicans and industry officials called the new standard overly strict and said it could hurt economic growth and cause job losses in areas where pollution levels are determined to be too high. Conservative critics said they feared the rule was the beginning of a "regulatory cliff" that includes a forthcoming EPA rule on ozone, or smog, as well as pending greenhouse gas regulations for refineries and rules curbing mercury emissions at power plants.

Ross Eisenberg, vice president of the National Association of Manufacturers, said the new soot rule is "yet another costly, overly burdensome" regulation that is "out of sync" with President Barack Obama's executive order last year to streamline federal regulations.

The soot rule will "place many promising new projects -- and the jobs they create -- into permit limbo," Eisenberg said.

A letter signed by one Democratic and five Republican senators said the EPA rule would "impose significant new economic burdens on many communities, hurting workers and their families just as they are struggling to overcome difficult economic times."

     

Comments made about this article - 0 Total

Comment on this article

Advertisement
The Recorder Sports Schedule

 

The Recorder Newscast

Most Popular

    Area high school sports calendar
    Friday, October 17, 2014

    World War II tank drama 'Fury' is a barrage of heavy-handedness
    Thursday, October 16, 2014

    Vacant home is leveled by fire
    Monday, October 13, 2014

    Amsterdam wins Southeast title in game marred by fight
    Saturday, October 18, 2014

    Teen girls busted for house fire
    Thursday, October 16, 2014

    Legislative sparks fly Veto threatened after Fonda vote
    Thursday, October 16, 2014

    Worker policy is on the agenda
    Monday, October 13, 2014

    Police report
    Friday, October 17, 2014

    Brown narrowing college choices
    Friday, October 17, 2014

    Amsterdam blanks Hudson Falls 6-0
    Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Advertisement

Copyright © Port Jackson Media, LLC.

Privacy Policies: Recorder

Contact Us

Twitter

Instagram

Facebook