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Letters to the Editor

Saturday, April 27, 2013 - Updated: 3:49 PM

What living is all about

To the editor:

The other day, as I was waiting for my son to take me for a haircut, my mind flashed back to my first haircut in the city. It was 1935. Market Street was cobblestone and trolley tracks ran the length of the city. There were two bus lines, FS&G and Vollmers. The barber shop was a one-chair unit on Division Street. The cost of the haircut was 25 cents. I guess that's why we refer to them as "the good old days."

Today, the price is $14. But, because of my age (86), it is $12. For the past 20 years I've been going to the Hagaman Barber Shop. I first went there when Vince and Steve were there. Today we have Jeff, Jim and Micah, and they are professional to a "T." The only thing that rubs me the wrong way is their motto. It was pilfered from the death house in Sing Sing where they used to execute people in the electric chair. The motto is "Three chairs -- no waiting."

While in the village of Hagaman we stop at Stewart's for several reasons. They make the best cup of coffee in town at a reasonable price, the help is very courteous, and when they advertise maple walnut or butter pecan ice-cream, you know there is more than an adequate amount of walnuts and pecans in each unit. They also sell 64-ounce half gallons and you pay the same as other ice creams selling 48-ounce units.

The big key for us in Hagaman is CP's Restaurant. Our children like to take us out to dinner as often as we feel able to go. They have a tendency to take us to upscale places like 99 in Rotterdam, Romano's in Johnstown, or Blue Ribbon Diner in Schenectady. But, if we have a choice, we pick CP's for several reasons. We've never had bad service, always had good food, the prices of everything, everywhere, have gone up, but CP's has had those $8.95 specials for five to six years. You never leave there hungry. I just hate to see my children go for $80 to $100 and then have to come home and make a sandwich before we go to bed.

In my writings, I searched for something negative to say about this community or its residents. The longer I looked, the more positive I became, that this community is full of quality people with a true sense of what living is all about.

I was 17 before I ever had a date, because the word "date" denotes the need of "money" and fiscally, I always had a terminal case of the "shorts." Of course, another reason was, I wasn't another pretty face. My sisters told me that I looked like I had been in a hatchet fight with four guys and I was the only one who didn't have a hatchet. Other people told me I looked like a goalie for a dart team. And, when my son was born, my mother came to see him and she said, "Jim he looks just like you, but don't worry, he'll outgrow it."

More to follow.

James Sheridan,

Amsterdam

A great day to be a Republican

To the editor:

This past Monday, April 22, was a great day to be a Republican in Montgomery County, as evidenced by the great turnout for the Republican Committee's annual "Salute to Reagan" dinner and gathering. To be in the same room with so many great Republican leaders -- Chris Gibson, George Amedore, Hugh Farley, Tom DiMezza, Ron Barone, Butch Greco, Barbara Wheeler -- was both humbling and exciting. At the epicenter of it all was Joe Emanuele, Republican Committee chairman, to whom Montgomery County owes a tremendous debt of gratitude. I don't think people realize (I certainly didn't) the critical role and responsibility that committee chairs play in the political process. For no motivation other than fulfilling civic responsibility, Joe Emanuele works tirelessly to identify, vet and run the types of quality candidates that the party has come to expect and the taxpayers demand. Joe is responsible for setting the tone with our state, local and national officials while seeing that the party's goals are met and Montgomery County's identity is preserved and concerns addressed.

In a world where being a Republican, in some circles, is not only unfashionable but downright distasteful, and in a general political climate where civility and honesty seem to be, sadly, lost arts, and where rhetoric proves itself more often than not to be disappointingly empty, Joe manages the daily business of the Montgomery County Republicans with the type of quiet grace, competence, strength of character and dedication to conservative principles that we have come to expect from him. I could not imagine, nor would I want, anyone else at the helm of Montgomery County's GOP. With the new era of a legislature dawning in Montgomery County, this is an exciting time for Republicans. I would love to see more people like Joe involved in this and to run for the open legislator seats. After all, it takes people like Joe Emanuele who, rather than sitting on the sidelines, has answered the call of duty and is making democracy happen every single day. With Joe Emanuele as the party boss, I know that we can make every day a great day to be a Republican.

Katie Evenson Bottger,

Ames

Educating the whole child

To the editor:

Recess is often seen as a highlight of the school day. Recently, unstructured play breaks got an endorsement from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

Many schools have been forced to reduce or eliminate recess in order to spend more time working on math, reading and other academic pursuits.

The AAP recently issued a policy statement saying that recess should not be withheld from children as punishment; that it should complement -- but not replace -- physical education; and that it can benefit children's cognitive, academic and social development in addition to contributing to overall physical fitness.

"It's important to protect recess," said Catherine Ramstetter, who co-authored the policy statement with Robert Murray. "The fundamental goal of school is to provide academic and cognitive development, and recess is part of that."

Educating the whole child, body and mind, is critical for the development of well-rounded, healthy, successful children.

Kelly Pilkey,

Glens Falls

The writer is a program coordinator for Healthy Schools New York.

     

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