Lawsuit claims rodent was baked into Chick-fil-A sandwich

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A lawsuit claims a suburban Philadelphia woman got an extra topping on her Chick-fil-A sandwich: a dead rodent.

Ellen Manfalouti sued in Bucks County Court over the tiny rodent she claims was baked into the bottom bun of her chicken sandwich.

A co-worker picked up the sandwich for her at a Langhorne restaurant in November, and the two started to eat in a conference room at the insurance agency where they work.

“I felt something funny on the bottom of the bun,” Manfalouti told The Philadelphia Inquirer on Monday. “I turned it over. I said to (my co-worker), ‘They burned my roll really bad.’”

Her co-worker, Cara Phelan, said that as soon as Manfalouti threw the sandwich on the table, “I realized it was a small rodent of some sort. I could see the whiskers and the tail.”

Manfalouti’s lawyer Bill Davis told the newspaper that he filed the lawsuit last week against Chick-fil-A franchise owner Dave Heffernan and the store after they weren’t responsive to complaints.

Heffernan and the Atlanta-based fast-food chain said they can’t comment on litigation.

Manfalouti is seeking more than $50,000 for physical and psychological damages.

Southwest apologizes to top-tier customers for boarding fail

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines continues to have computer problems that are causing its best customers to lose a major perk — early boarding.

The airline said Wednesday that it partially fixed the problem but was still working to make things right and find the cause of the glitch.

A spokeswoman says Southwest is giving extra frequent-flyer points to A-List and A-List Preferred customers who didn’t get priority boarding in the last few days. A-List members take at least 50 one-way flights or earn a certain number of points in a year.

Most Southwest passengers board in the order they check in. Priority privileges can mean the difference between an aisle seat up front or a middle seat farther back.

Union Pacific lays off 500 managers, 250 other rail workers

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Union Pacific is laying off 500 managers and 250 other workers to save about $110 million annually and eliminate about 8 percent of the railroad’s managers.

The railroad told the affected workers Wednesday that their jobs will be eliminated by mid-September.

Union Pacific CEO Lance Fritz said that eliminating open positions through attrition and improving productivity isn’t enough to cut costs.

“Union Pacific for some time has leveraged employee attrition and technology to reduce general and administrative costs,” Fritz said. “Unfortunately, attrition alone will not keep pace with our need and ability to reduce these costs.”

Union Pacific said the layoffs are expected to produce about $110 million in annual cost savings, but the railroad will record $90 million in pretax severance costs — mostly in the third quarter — because of them.

Railroads have been under pressure to reduce costs because of modest growth in freight shipments overall and a sharp decline in coal shipments in recent years. Both of the major freight railroads in the eastern United States — CSX and Norfolk Southern — have announced more aggressive cost-cutting efforts in the past year.

CSX has announced 2,300 layoffs this year as part of a major restructuring under new CEO Hunter Harrison, who took over in March.

Norfolk Southern is working to reduce its expenses by $650 million and improve efficiency by 2020. The railroad expects to cut more than $100 million in costs this year after trimming $250 million last year.

Most of Union Pacific’s layoffs will be at the railroad’s headquarters in Omaha, Nebraska, but they will affect Union Pacific’s 23-state network. In the second quarter, Union Pacific had about 42,000 employees.