Author: Recorder News

AHS swimmers pull out win over HF-SGF, 87-79

Amsterdam’s Olivia Brahler swims the 100-yard butterfly during Thursday’s meet against Hudson Falls-South Glens Falls at Lynch Literacy Academy. (Adam Shinder/Recorder staff) By ADAM SHINDER @RecorderShinder If the Amsterdam High School girls swim team was going to come away with a win Thursday against Hudson Falls-South Glens Falls, the Lady Rams needed their 400-yard freestyle relay team to deliver. Clinging to a two-point lead heading into the final race of the meet, Amsterdam needed a win from its foursome of Azia Aldi, Paige Bertuch, Julianna Busseno and Kelly Kilgallen to hold of a rally from HF-SGF and secure the...

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OC Sullivan to call plays for Giants

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. (AP) — Mike Sullivan has become the new face of the New York Giants’ offense. After more than a year as the team’s offensive coordinator, the 50-year-old Sullivan was given the job of calling the plays on offense after the Giants lost their first five games in Ben McAdoo’s second season as head coach. McAdoo had called the plays since arriving as the offensive coordinator under Tom Coughlin in 2014. He kept doing the job when he became the head coach last season. With the team struggling and facing injuries to star receivers Odell Beckham Jr., Brandon Marshall and Sterling Shepard, McAdoo handed the job to Sullivan last week. The result was an immediate success. The Giants’ pass-orientated offense turned to the run and gained 148 yards in stunning the Denver Broncos 23-10 on Sunday night. Sullivan refused to take any credit Thursday as the Giants (1-5) finished their second day of practice for Sunday’s game against the Seattle Seahawks (3-2). It was a team thing, he said. It also was the answer everyone expected from the 50-year West Point graduate, who comes off more like a professor than a coach. Watch him on the sideline, and the glasses that he usually keeps in his pocket come out to read the play card. The play-calling job is nothing new for Sullivan. He did it for two...

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Jets tight end Seferian-Jenkins goes from cautionary tale to comeback kid

FLORHAM PARK, N.J. (AP) — Austin Seferian-Jenkins limped out of Gillette Stadium last Christmas Eve and worried about his uncertain future. The New York Jets tight end was dealing with demons in his personal life, and his body was betraying him. Just three years into his NFL career, Seferian-Jenkins’ life was spinning out of control. “I’m lucky to be here,” he said after practice earlier this week. “The last time I played the Patriots, I pulled my hamstring and I thought that was the last time I was ever going to play football. I’m thankful for the opportunity that I was able to play them and I’m thankful for everything that’s happened.” Just 10 months after that game in New England, Seferian-Jenkins is in the middle of a massive comeback story. On the field — and, more importantly, off it. He’s second on the team with 23 catches, already a career high despite him being suspended the first two games of the season for violating the NFL’s substance abuse policy last year. “He worked on himself all offseason, and that’s tough to do, especially when you have things go bad for you,” coach Todd Bowles said. “But I’m happy for him. He’s the kind of guy you root for.” That hasn’t always been the case for the 25-year-old Seferian-Jenkins, who a year ago was dealing with having been arrested...

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Cotto bids farewell to the ring

NEW YORK (AP) — The usually stoic Miguel Cotto gets emotional thinking about all the important family moments he missed in two decades as a boxer. Countless hours in the gym, training to become a four-time world champion, kept him away from his wife and four children for weeks and months at a time. No more after this fight. Cotto will bid farewell to the ring when he faces Sadam Ali on Dec. 2 in Madison Square Garden — his “second home,” as he calls it, where he will fight for the 10th time to finish his career. After 46 action-packed bouts in four weight classes, the 36-year-old Puerto Rican said he has no regrets about this decision to call it quits, and is looking forward to making up for lost time with his wife Melissa and his children, ages 10 to 21. “I’ve missed birthdays, graduations … you name it,” a teary Cotto said Tuesday in an interview with The Associated Press. “Those moments are not coming back, but I’ll enjoy each day to the fullest. And now I won’t miss a single day of their lives.” Cotto recalled a promise he made long ago to retire at 30 years old, one he obviously did not keep. That was almost seven years ago — he turns 37 on Oct. 29 — and since then he fought nine times...

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Hayward, Lin out for year, and many others in NBA are ailing

Boston Celtics’ Gordon Hayward grimaces in pain in the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Cleveland Cavaliers, Tuesday, in Cleveland. Hayward broke his left ankle on the play. (The Associated Press) MIAMI (AP) — Brooklyn’s Jeremy Lin was horrified to see what happened to Gordon Hayward, whose season almost certainly ended in a most disturbing fashion five minutes into the Celtics’ season-opener. A night later, Lin met a similar fate. Here’s some of what should be celebrated from the opening nights of the NBA season: Milwaukee’s Giannis Antetokounmpo had a 37-point game, Cleveland’s LeBron James was...

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Butler’s arrival makes this the best roster in Timberwolves history

By JIM SOUHAN Star Tribune (Minneapolis) MINNEAPOLIS — New players often are described as pieces of a puzzle. That isn’t quite right. Puzzles are two-dimensional and static. In sports, adding a key player is more like trying to inject a sprinting racehorse with adrenaline while rounding the backstretch, a delicate, maybe even dangerous procedure. Minnesotans know this. Herschel Walker was supposed to become the last piece of a simplistic puzzle. He got everyone fired. The Kevin Garnett trade was supposed to rebuild the Wolves. Instead it cratered a struggling franchise for an extra decade. The Johan Santana trade yielded too little, and many of the best Minnesota trades of the past few decades landed then-underappreciated talents — Joe Nathan, Shannon Stewart, Devan Dubnyk — but not established stars. The Timberwolves began their most promising season in more than a dozen years Wednesday night in San Antonio against one of the gold standards of sports intelligence, and they were the team in the building that made the last, best move. Their trade for Jimmy Butler gives the Wolves the best roster in franchise history and could well prove to be the best trade by a Minnesota team since the Vikings landed Jared Allen. And Allen, unlike Butler, couldn’t play two ways or lead an offense. The last time the Wolves added a quality guard to a team that looked ready...

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Brantley has surgery, Indians weighing options on his future

CLEVELAND (AP) — The damaged ligaments in Michael Brantley’s right ankle have been stabilized. The All-Star left fielder’s future with the Cleveland Indians remains unsteady. Brantley had surgery to repair an ankle injury that bothered him much of this season, sidelined him for 50 games over the final two months and limited him during the playoffs. The 30-year-old will need up to five months to recover from the operation, which was performed Wednesday in Charlotte, North Carolina, by Dr. Robert Anderson. Team president Chris Antonetti said the team expects Brantley to “be ready for the start of the season or very close to the start of the season next year.” However, in the interim, the Indians have some tough decisions to make on Brantley, who has played in just 101 games over the past two seasons because of injuries. The club has until three days after the conclusion of the World Series to either pick up his $12 million contract for 2018 or pay him a $1 million buyout, allowing him to become a free agent. Antonetti and manager Terry Francona have made it clear the Indians want to keep Brantley, but now the club has to consider the cost of hanging onto a player they admire but one who has been breaking down. “What we know about Michael is that when he’s been healthy, he’s been really productive,”...

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Astros now trailing Yanks in ALCS, need 9th Verlander win

Houston Astros’ Justin Verlander watches from the dugout during the eighth inning of Game 5 of baseball’s American League Championship Series against the New York Yankees Wednesday, in New York. (The Associated Press)   HOUSTON (AP) — Justin Verlander agreed to that last-minute trade to the Houston Astros with hopes of another World Series, and has since won all eight games he has pitched. Eight is not enough. The Astros have to win Verlander’s ninth game — or their season will end short of that goal. “Obviously. I know this is one of the main reasons I was brought...

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40 years ago, Brett punched Nettles in the ALCS. Then the game continued

By RUSTIN DODD The Kansas City Star KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The clip is grainy. It is short. It is 3 minutes and 22 seconds, to be precise, and it is amazing. It is 40 years old, too, its anniversary coming earlier this month, and as the baseball playoffs continue it is a window into another time, one hardly recognizable today. On Saturday night in Game 1 of the National League Championship Series, Cubs manager Joe Maddon was left puzzled and upset after his catcher, Willson Contreras, stuck his leg in front of home plate, allowing the Los Angeles Dodgers’ Charlie Culberson to be ruled safe without ever touching home. Contreras had blocked the plate, failing to provide an unobstructed path for the runner. Culberson avoided a major collision and was vindicated by rule and a replay review. “It’s sad the direction our game has gone,” Cubs pitcher John Lackey said afterward. “That’s a textbook play by the kid, and he got penalized for it. It just wasn’t right.” And then there was 40 years ago: Game 5 of the 1977 American League Championship Series in Kansas City, the Royals’ George Brett tripling in the bottom of the first inning, sliding hard into third base and hurling a fist at Yankees third baseman Graig Nettles. The overhand right ignited a wild brawl. The scene ended in the strangest way...

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This season, it really is the Warriors vs. the world

By DIETER KURTENBACH The Mercury News OAKLAND, Calif. — Days after the Golden State Warriors capped off what is perhaps the best three-year in run in NBA history with their second championship in June, Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey made a proclamation: “We are used to long odds,” Morey told ESPN.com. “If Golden State makes the odds longer, we might up our risk profile and get even more aggressive. We have something up our sleeve.” What was up their sleeve was a clever and league-rattling trade for Clippers point guard and eight-time All-NBA selection Chris Paul. “I guess he took some risks,” Draymond Green chided Monday. And Morey wasn’t the only NBA general manager who “upped his risk profile” in response to the Warriors. Simply put: Golden State’s dominance led the NBA to lose its mind this past offseason. From the second the confetti fell at Oracle Arena up until now, there hasn’t been a quiet moment. The NBA became a year-round league this year — the drama and intrigue and pandemonium of this offseason guaranteed that. And the Warriors’ success guaranteed that. When this Warriors team won their first title in 2015, no one saw it coming — including the Warriors. Their 73-win season the next year was capped by an unprecedented squandering of a 3-1 NBA Finals lead, but that laid the groundwork for the acquisition...

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